5 Tips for Creating an Effective Whiteboard Animation

Whiteboard animations require many innovative ideas, careful decisions and gutsy implementations. Developing a script and the entire pre-production planning stage before the creation of any type of creative work is one of the most important things that one must ensure to work on. Below are a few important tips for an effective whiteboard animation. These tips will enable you to create a great impression in the minds of your audiences and fans.

1. A great script is a must

As far as whiteboard animations are concerned, an average script will not do much favor to you. You need a great script and a one that can help you to create a major impression in the minds of the people or your audiences to keep it simple. Your story must be bought to life in an extraordinary manner.

2. Having a believable flow

Just like it happens in real life, your whiteboard animation should have a story line that is quite distinct in the middle, beginning as well as ending. This means that the videos should be short in order to keep the attention of the audiences. Your story must be told in such a manner that does not take very long to unfold so that the viewers can get a grasp of what you are exactly saying.

3. Having a powerful imagery

Powerful imagery and dynamic illustrations are always at the heart of a successful whiteboard animation. This means that one should ideally spend most of the time creating the images for the whiteboard presentations.

4. A captivating audio

Soundtrack is the heart of a film and same goes to a whiteboard animation. The audio tracks should be captivated in such a manner that they are able to create a very positive impression in the minds of the viewer or a normal audience. There are also a lot of character voice- overs that should be extremely believable and dynamic and this means that they should enhance and not detract from your work.

5. Concentrate on the background music

Background music can also be described as an essence to your whiteboard animation. This is because the viewers will be able to connect emotionally to your content. This means that the will be able to create a great memory as far as your animation is concerned and as a viewer this is what we require. It is one of the important things to remember.

Illustration Techniques for Designers

There are several techniques or styles of making an illustration. Each of these techniques has its distinctive process and media specially used for creating the illustration. The graphic artist must therefore familiarize himself well with a particular technique before adopting and using it for the production of a graphic design product. Examples of some of the techniques in illustration are:

1. Pen and wash- This illustration technique involves the drawing of the outlines of the illustration in pencil. Ink is used to go over the drawn outlines in pencil. When it is dried, a small quantity of the ink is diluted with water in a lighter tone. Brush is used to apply the paint at the darker areas of the drawing. The painted areas are washed to create various tones to bring out the forms of the illustration. The outlines are made stronger by the use of pen lines. It is used for catalogues, village and market scenes, fashion design magazines, book covers etc.

2. Pen and ink- This is the use of pen and ink to draw the outlines of the drawing and using any of the shading methods to bring out the forms in the drawing. It is used for illustrations in books, newspapers and magazines.

3. Flat colour painting- In this technique, the colours are painted flat with no gradation in tone. The edges of the sections of the painted drawings are sharp and distinct, setting the difference in the various parts of the drawing. It is used for illustrations in story books, road signs, greeting cards etc.

4. Realistic painting- This is the drawing of objects to show great details as they actually appear in nature. It is used for advertisement, fashion magazine and illustrations in books.

5. Silhouette- This is the creating of the outlines of a drawing in pencil and filling the inner part uniformly with black paint or ink. Silhouette drawings do not show details just the outlines that define the objects are shown. They are used for road signs, package symbols, illustrations in fashion magazines etc.

6. Cartooning- This is the creation of humorous or satirical figures with exaggerated forms. This illustration technique is used for illustrating children books, newspapers, magazines etc.

7. Photography- This is the taking of shots of real objects and scenes by the use of a camera. It gives the exact likeness of the objects and scenes. Photographs are used for posters, magazines, newspapers etc.

Vector Art Techinque

Vector Art is a technique, which means art created with vector-based programs. Vector art basically uses dots, lines, and curves. Vector programs take note of the relationship between these elements. This allows images created to vary their scale without losing quality or pixelating. In comparison, pixels lose quality when they are raised above 100% of their size.

Popular vector programs are Illustrator, Freehand, Corel Draw, and Flash. Almost everything created with these programs is considered as vector work. I say “almost” because there are exceptions to each rule. If your vector work combines vector images with raster images, I’m afraid that it is no longer a vectorial work (and consequently does not belong to the Vector Gallery).

For example: to finish your vectorial work, you think that your work is missing something, and you put it in Photoshop to give it a small texture, trying to complete it more. At that moment it is no longer a vector work, and you should upload it to “Digital art> Mixed Media”. In the same way, if you take the rasterized texture and put it in Illustrator by applying a layer style, nor would it be a vector work.

As this texture cannot be increased by over 100%, it makes your vector technically useless after raster images in original size. Do not even think that you cannot add textures to your vector work. Many of these programs come equipped with samples of detailed patterns, textured brushes, even with “Live Trace”, which as its name indicates, traces raster images and converts them into vector graphics.

Reiterating and ensuring there is no confusion, here is a list with programs generally considered as raster-based: Photoshop, Painter, MS Paint and a great free alternative, Gimp. Basically, everything created with this program is considered rasterized image. A few of these programs are able to create images with points, lines, and curves, just as a vector program would do.

The same Photoshop can make images based on vectors, however, they are usually considered “vexel” because vexel artists usually include brush strokes on their images (for hair, etc.).

Speaking of brushes. Just because you have downloaded and installed a set of brushes for Photoshop (or any other raster image program) that has the word “vector” in its title, it does NOT mean that your work is vectorial. These brushes come in various sizes, and no matter what resolution you apply them, they can never be increased above 100% of their size without losing quality.

How to Write an Explainer Video Script

The script is the most important part of the explainer video production process for good reason. You can have all the pretty design elements you like, mesmerising animation and a killer soundtrack, but if the script doesn’t clearly explain what you need to get across and hook the viewer in, your explainer won’t work.

Here’s a typical explainer video script that you might’ve heard:

Meet Jim. He does this job.

His life sucks because of these problems.

But now there’s This amazing product/service!

It fixes all of Jim’s problems in this innovative way and also does these other amazing things that Jim never even dreamed of. It can make your life better too.

Go to amazingproduct.com and sign up now.

Amazing Product. There is no better product.

Now, granted, this oversimplified version of a user-case scenario may sound a bit tired, and we’re not suggesting that every explainer should sound the same, but it covers all the basics and allows us a chance to examine the key elements of an explainer script.

Let’s break it up, and take a closer look:

The intro

Meet Jim. He does this job.

His life sucks because of these problems.

Straight off the bat, the viewer is given a situation which we hope he or she can identify with: she also has that problem! And she can’t wait to find out how to fix it.

The danger here is that there are often loads of problems and so it’s easy to dwell here too long, going on and on about all the pitfalls of the current way things are done. That’s not necessary. Establish the issue and move on to the solution as soon as you can. And don’t go too wild in your description of the problem! Some products simply make life easier – the world was turning long before your new pineapple peeler came on the market…

Your product

But now there’s This amazing product/service!

It fixes all of Jim’s problems in this innovative way and also does these other amazing things that Jim never even dreamed of. It can make your life better too.

Now you tell the world what you’ve got. Introduce the product or service, outline how it solves the problem, some of the key features and benefits and try to spur the viewer’s imagination of how she could use it. This is what they call your USP – your Unique Selling Proposition that will offer a unique or differentiated solution for their pain point. You’re now relatable AND likeable.

Call to action

Always, always, have a call to action. A web address, a social media handle, anything – as long as it sends the viewer somewhere once you have their attention. There’s no point identifying with them, offering a solution and then… leaving. Give them the thing they need to take the next step in using your product or service – a way to get in touch.

And keep it short! If you can say it in 1 minute, why use 2?

As long as you’ve kept your script entertaining, engaging and memorable, and give the viewer a way to take you up on your offer, your explainer video gets you 90% of the way towards converting a potential lead into a loyal client.

Trend of Animation! Redefining The App Interface

The chief reason for app developers to constantly nurture techniques for incorporating brilliant animated effects in the apps is holding back the attention of customers. Anything that is not static and is moving in an interesting way will surely draw more attention than a simple graphic image. A bit tedious part in development, developers don’t ever shrink away from the concept of animation because of the captivating experience they can provide to the users.

While there are many ways to indulge animations in an app’s user interface and that’s the concern of the developers, here we’ve explained how including animations will redefine your app’s interface and make it way more interesting to use.

It makes your application interface a lively thing

With animations, users get a fun-filled lively experience while strolling across the app. Even when stage arrives where some data has to load from the server and users have nothing to do, there’s stuff moving in the background. This gives an assurance that they are not in a deadlock situation, but the process is ongoing.

For users, waiting for a function is no more annoying

Regardless of what your app offers or how exhilarating it is, most hate the idea of waiting too long for a page to appear. Moreover, that gives a frozen look to the app while the page loads and makes the users impatient. Use of some catchy animation, like a spinner, 3D bar or sand-clock. Even though the wait time at the juncture of the app, such animation keep the attention hooked at least for some more time.

Navigation takes an interesting turn

Users mostly get perplexed while moving to different locations in the app on their own. At the first use, they are not sure whether they are moving in the right way. Now, animated objects can guide them through and prevent any wrong clicks while scrolling abruptly.

Motion images, animated icons and graphics can well intercept the user’s next move and provide them instructions in an interactive way. Benefits of interactive animations for navigation are seamless transition from one location to location and setting up a hierarchy visually that one phase has a connection to other.

Responses with visuals leave a long-lasting impression

When an app responds to a user’s input with some visual element, it seems to give a human touch. The users get a feel-good experience with such feedback as they interpret to have some control over the app. There are different ways to place animations and a key way is to make the buttons react in some way or the other whenever one taps.